PowerShell and Twilio: SMS

Twilio is a cloud based messaging service; it can do everything from sending SMS’s, to being the basis of an entirely cloud based virtual call centre.  It’s pretty powerful stuff.

My requirements are fairly basic though, I just want to be able to send SMS’s from a PowerShell script to engineers to alert them when things go wrong.  The first thing to do is head over to Twilio and set yourself a test account up, which is free, and will allow you to send messages to yourself.

All interaction with Twilio is via their REST API and the first method I have to interact with it is using the official Twilio C# DLLs, the instructions to download are here. Once you have the DLLs, pop them in the same directory as the script you are going to be running and here’s a function to make use of them along with a sample call:

function invoke-twilioSMS ( [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$AccountSid, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$message, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$fromTel, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$toTel, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$authToken, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$dllPath ) { Add-Type -path "$dllPath\RestSharp.dll" Add-Type -path "$dllPath\Twilio.Api.dll" $twilio = new-object Twilio.TwilioRestClient($AccountSid,$authToken) $msg = $twilio.SendSmsMessage($fromTel, $toTel, $message) } invoke-twilioSMS -AccountSid "<AccountSid>" ` -authToken "<authToken>" -message "<message>" ` -fromTel "<fromTel"> -toTel "<toTel>" ` -dllPath "<scriptPath>"

The problem with this method is that it’s awkward to get hold of the DLLs, and I find there is something clunky about having to use DLLs to call a REST API.  So in method 2, I make use of the Invoke-RestMethod (which arrived in PowerShell 3.0) to talk to the REST API directly.

function invoke-twilioRESTSMS ( [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$AccountSid, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$message, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$fromTel, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$toTel, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$authToken ) { # Build a URI $URI = "https://api.twilio.com/2010-04-01/Accounts/$AccountSid/SMS/Messages.json" # encode authorization header $secureAuthToken = ConvertTo-SecureString $authToken -AsPlainText -Force $credential = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential($AccountSid,$secureAuthToken) # content $postData = "From=$fromTel&To=$toTel&Body=$message" # Fire Request $msg = Invoke-RestMethod -Uri $URI -Body $postData -Credential $credential -Method "POST" -ContentType "application/x-www-form-urlencoded" } invoke-twilioRESTSMS -AccountSid "<AccountSid>" ` -authToken "<authToken>" -message "<message>" ` -fromTel "<fromTel"> -toTel "<toTel>"

Method 2 is my preferred why of doing things for something as simple as sending a SMS.

There is still one further way to send a message using PowerShell and Twilio, and this addresses those who are using PowerShell 2.0, so can’t use Invoke-RestMethod, and don’t want to use the DLLs; we can still build a request from scratch using the System.Net.WebRequest object:

function post-twilioSMS ( [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$AccountSid, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$message, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$fromTel, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$toTel, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$authToken ) { # Build a URI $URI = "https://api.twilio.com/2010-04-01/Accounts/$AccountSid/SMS/Messages.json" $requestUri = new-object Uri ($URI) # Create the request and specify attributes of the request. $request = [System.Net.WebRequest]::Create($requestUri) # encode authorization header $authText = $AccountSid + ":" + $authToken $authUTF8 = [System.Text.Encoding]::UTF8.GetBytes($authText) $auth64 = [System.Convert]::ToBase64String($authUTF8) # Define the requred headers $request.Method = "POST" $request.Headers.Add("Authorization: Basic $auth64"); $request.Accept = "application/json, application/xml, text/json, text/x-json, text/javascript, text/xml" $request.ContentType = "application/x-www-form-urlencoded" # content $fromTel = [System.Web.HttpUtility]::UrlEncode($fromTel) $toTel = [System.Web.HttpUtility]::UrlEncode($toTel) $message = [System.Web.HttpUtility]::UrlEncode($message) $postData = "From=$fromTel&To=$toTel&Body=$message" $request.ContentLength = $postData.Length # Stream Bytes $postBytes = [System.Text.Encoding]::ascii.GetBytes($postData) $requestStream = $request.GetRequestStream() $requestStream.Write($postBytes, 0,$postBytes.length) $requestStream.flush() $requestStream.Close() # Fire Request $response = $request.GetResponse() # Output Response $responseStream = $response.GetResponseStream() $responseReader = New-Object System.IO.StreamReader $responseStream $returnedResponse = $responseReader.ReadToEnd() $response.close() } post-twilioSMS -AccountSid "<AccountSid>" ` -authToken "<authToken>" -message "<message>" ` -fromTel "<fromTel"> -toTel "<toTel>" ` -dllPath "<scriptPath>"

Method 3 works just fine, its lacks the simplicity of Method 2, but it does give you very granular control over what the Web Request is doing; which I have found very useful when working with other REST API’s which aren’t quite as well behaved as Twilio.

THIS POSTING AND CODE RELATED TO IT ARE PROVIDED “AS IS” AND INFERS NO WARRANTIES OR RIGHTS, USE AT YOUR OWN RISK

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Filtered Azure Blob to Blob Copy

I recently had the job of copying ten’s of thousands of IIS log files, each one at least 100MB, from one Azure Storage account to another.  Using something simple like CloudBerry to copy the file just wasn’t going to cut it as it copies the file first to the local client, then pushes it back into Azure, not efficient at all.

A quick bit of digging and I discovered that the Azure PowerShell cmdlet Start-AzureStorageBlobCopy allows you to trigger a copy Azure to Azure, which runs very quickly, it will even allow you to copy an entire container from one storage account to another; what it won’t allow you to do is pass a filter in so only copies files matching the filter.

So here’s a function that I wrote to get that functionality, with some progress bars and timers for added effect 🙂

Function Start-AzureStorageBlobContainerCopy ( [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$srcStorageAccountName, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$destStorageAccountName, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$SrcStorageAccountKey, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$DestStorageAccountKey, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$SrcContainer, [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)][String]$DestContainer, [String]$filter = "" ) { Import-Module Azure $srcContext = New-AzureStorageContext -StorageAccountName $srcStorageAccountName -StorageAccountKey $SrcStorageAccountKey $destContext = New-AzureStorageContext -StorageAccountName $destStorageAccountName -StorageAccountKey $DestStorageAccountKey $timeTaken = measure-command{ if ($filter -ne "") { $blobs = Get-AzureStorageBlob -Container $SrcContainer -Context $srcContext | ? {$_.name -match $filter} } else { $blobs = Get-AzureStorageBlob -Container $SrcContainer -Context $srcContext } } Write-host "Total Time to index $timeTaken" -BackgroundColor Black -ForegroundColor Green $i = 0 $timeTaken = measure-command{ foreach ($blob in $blobs) { $i++ Write-Progress -Activity:"Copying..." -Status:"Copied $i of $($blobs.Count) : $($percentComplete)%" -PercentComplete:$percentComplete $copyInfo = Start-AzureStorageBlobCopy -ICloudBlob $blob.ICloudBlob -Context $srcContext -DestContainer $DestContainer -DestContext $destContext -Force Write-host (get-date) $copyInfo.name } } write-host Write-host "Total Time $timeTaken" -BackgroundColor Black -ForegroundColor Green } Start-AzureStorageBlobContainerCopy -srcStorageAccountName "<src Storage>" -SrcStorageAccountKey "<src key>" -SrcContainer "<src Container>" ` -destStorageAccountName "<dest Storage>" -DestStorageAccountKey "<dest key>" -DestContainer "<dest Container>" ` -filter "<filter>"

THIS POSTING AND CODE RELATED TO IT ARE PROVIDED “AS IS” AND INFERS NO WARRANTIES OR RIGHTS, USE AT YOUR OWN RISK